NEWSRAU Ph.D. Student Vanik Shahnazaryan Defended his Thesis at the University of Iceland
29.10.2017
RAU Ph.D. Student Vanik Shahnazaryan Defended his Thesis at the University of Iceland
 
Ph.D. student of Russian-Armenian University Vanik Shahnazaryan defended his Ph.D thesis “Collective quantum phenomena in the strong light - matter coupling regime” at the University of Iceland.
 
This year marks the University's 20th anniversary, and along with celebrating 20 years of academic success, RAU celebrates the achievements of its alumni - Vanik Shahnazaryan is the first Ph.D. student of RAU Department of General Physics and Quantum Nanostructures to defend his Ph.D. research at a university abroad.  
 
Vanik Shahnazaryan highlighted that the physics of light-matter interactions is a rapidly developing interdisciplinary research area, combining methods and phenomena both from condensed matter physics and quantum optics and explained that the intensive electromagnetic field is a powerful tool that allows to flexibly manage, for example, the physical properties of semiconductor materials, leading to the emergence of a number of significant quantum phenomena.
 
The achieved results can be of interest not only from the pure scientific point of view and but also serve as a theoretical basis for designing new-generation nonlinear electro-optical equipment”, he mentioned, adding that RAU contributed a lot to his achievements.
 
Further elaborating on the topic of his dissertation, he said that he theoretically investigated various many body quantum quantum effects in the mentioned systems, including fluorescence spectra of an electromagnetically dressed asymmetric quantum dot; terahertz lasing from an ensemble of asymmetric quantum dots in the presence of dressing electromagnetic field; Bose-Einstein condensation of indirect excitons in a dipolariton setup; interparticle interactions between excited excitonic states in quantum wells and interparticle interactions between excited excitonic states in transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers.
 
To read the full Ph.D. thesis, follow the link.
 
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